Historical Solidarity Economy: Part 1

Here are historical examples, notable figures, and facts about of the solidarity economy.

Maggie Lena Walker (July 15, 1864 – December 15, 1934) was an African-American businesswoman and teacher. In 1903, Walker became both the first African American woman to charter a bank and the first African American woman to serve as a bank president. As a leader, Walker achieved successes with the vision to make tangible improvements in the way of life for African Americans. Disabled by paralysis and a wheelchair user later in life, Walker also became an example for people with disabilities.

The Ruthville Mercantile Coop “None o’ dem live by stealin. Dey wuked an’ made a hones livin.’” These words were used by Archie Booker to describe this historic free town. Booker had been a slave at the Glebe, a small plantation at the edge of the settlement. He said the “free town” was comprised of residents who all had little places of their own to work on. They operated stores and shops. Some were blacksmiths and wheelwrights.” http://databases.charlescity.org/freedom/exhibit3C.shtml

The National Association of Southern Poor | https://centerforneweconomics.org/publications/the-assembly-a-tool-for-transforming-communities/

The Readjuster Party

“The Readjuster Party was a bi-racial state-level political party formed in Virginia across party lines in the late 1870s during the turbulent period following the Reconstruction era that sought to reduce outstanding debt owed by the state. Readjusters aspired “to break the power of wealth and established privilege” among the planter elite of white men in the state and to promote public education. The party’s program attracted support among both white people and African-Americans.”

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